Atlanta CPR Training & Certification - Feed https://atlantacpr.net 1 Hour BLS Class Everyday Mon, 01 Mar 2021 23:01:11 +0000 en-US Don’t Take Any/ Another CPR Training Class Before Reading This https://atlantacpr.net/cpr/dont-take-any-another-cpr-training-class-before-reading-this/ Mon, 17 Feb 2020 14:23:34 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1218 Identifying that CPR training is a very important life-saving skill you should have is a great choice. However, that does not mean diving into the classes head on.

Before you step into the first class at all – or even register for one – here are a couple of things you have to know.

Choosing the right class level

Depending on why you want to learn Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the first place, there are different class levels to consider. While there are some restriction to learning them all, it would be great to start with one that really pertains to what you need to make the best impact.

The various class levels to pick from are:

  • Adult CPR – This Red Cross course covers Adults of about twelve years old to full-blown adults. This is the ideal class for Personal Trainers, , hotel housekeeping, Gym employees, and those tasked with caring for the elderly. For those who have access to a defibrillator as well, you should make sure to let your instructor know so they can teach you about your specific AED Automated External Defibrillator. The entire class should take less than 2 hours and 5 minutes for the whole Blended Learning and Hands on Skills Session.
  • Pediatric and Adult First Aid CPR AED– This Red Cross course covers when you deal with infants 0 days old – 1 years old and children of ages 1year old up to 12 twelve years (girls with budding breasts, and boys with facial and body hair are considered adults), Adults are12 years old and up, this is the class you should go for. This course is perfect for:
  • Physical fitness trainers
  • School Teachers, Child Care Workers , Nannies
  • Security Guards
  • School personnel
  • Tattoo artists
  • Maintenance workers
  • Police and Firefighters
  • Camp Counselors
  • other individuals who want or need first-aid training

 

*The administration of CPR to adults is way different to the approach for infants and children so you should be properly trained to help when need be.*

Basic Life Support – This class teaches medically trained personnel the basic life support for healthcare providers, so the classes are a little more in-depth than the ones above. An American Heart Association BLS Card is required for everyone working in, on, or around a medical team. The American Heart Association BLS (CPR) for Healthcare Provider is intended for:

Healthcare professionals, certified or noncertified, licensed or non-licensed, including:

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physicians Assistants
  • Nursing students, Medical students
  • Nursing Assistants, Medical Assistants
  • Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians
  • Respiratory, Physical, and Occupational Therapists
  • Residents or Fellows
  • Nurse Aides, and other Allied Health Personnel

 

What does the BLS course teach?

  • High-quality CPR for infants, children, and Adults
  • The AHA Chain of Survival, specifically the BLS components
  • Important early use of an AED
  • Effective ventilations using a barrier device and a bag valve mask when needed
  • Importance of teams in multirescuer resuscitation and performance as an effective team member during multirescuer CPR
  • Relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (choking) for adults and infants

 

Advanced Cardiac Life Support – This AHA class teaches the Advanced Cardiac Life Support for healthcare providers, so the classes are much more involved than the BLS course. This is required for everyone working in an advanced medical capacity –

WHO NEEDS THE ACLS CERTIFICATION?

The American Heart Association's HeartCode ACLS Course is intended for healthcare providers who either direct or participate in the resuscitation of an adult patient, whether in or out of the hospital, including:  

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physician's assistants
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Nursing students, Medical Students
  • Paramedics, EMT's
  • Pharmacists
  • Staff in intensive care units and emergency or critical care departments 

The class will take into consideration all Medications, Advanced CPR techniques and other Advanced procedures.

Pediatric Advanced Life Support – PALS for healthcare providers is for those who respond to emergencies in infants and children and for personnel in emergency response, emergency medicine, intensive care and critical care units

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physician's assistants
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Nursing students, Medical Students
  • Paramedics, EMT's
  • Pharmacists

What does this course teach?

The goal of the PALS Course is to improve the quality of care provided to seriously ill or injured infants, and children, resulting in better outcomes. Upon successful completion of all the patient cases, students must pass the multiple-choice exam with a minimum score of 84%. Topics include:

  • High-quality Child CPR AED and Infant CPR
  • Recognition of patients who do and do not require immediate intervention
  • Recognition of cardiopulmonary arrest early and application of CPR within 10 seconds
  • Apply team dynamics
  • Differentiation between respiratory distress and failure
  • Early interventions for respiratory distress and failure
  • Differentiation between compensated and decompensated (hypotensive) shock
  • Early interventions for the treatment of shock
  • Differentiation between unstable and stable patients with arrhythmias
  • Clinical characteristics of instability in patients with arrhythmias
  • Post–cardiac arrest management

These are so really high tech events. PALS is not for everyone, these are truly special people.

 

 

Choosing the right instructor

Your certification is important, no doubt, but not as important as the skill itself. That is why we recommend not only chasing the certificate but the proper knowledge too. That will only be possible if you learn from truly professional, certified, seasoned AHA, ARC Instructors. Our Instructors have varied backgrounds  (Nurses, physicians, EMT’s, and Paramedics in multi faceted emergency care settings.

No matter which level of CPR certification you aim to attain, the instructors at Atlanta CPR are up to the task. Having been doing this in the same spot for about a decade, and receiving a honors from the American Heart Association American Red Cross too, we comply with the current CPR training standards to ensure you’re capable to teaching these life-saving techniques perfectly whenever called upon.

 

Asking the right questions

Before putting your money and time into any CPR training program, you really want to know if it meets your expectations. Here, we expect you to ask questions on the lines of:

  1. Are you AHA / ARC Certified? If so, how long?

           We have instructors that have been certified and teaching for well over 25

  1. Passing The Test – Since there’s a certificate involved for BLS, ACLS, PALS, a test is mandatory for AHA Certification Classes. Likewise, you want to know what to do in case you don’t pass the first time. It’s a multiple choice test. You actually get multiple attempt to pass, until you pass. Just take your time.
  2. Hands on Skill Session – The practical Hands on Skills Session has to be performed with a Certified AHA / ARC Certified instructor.
  3. How good are your instructors– Afterall, no one can give what they don’t have. If the instructors are not certified, or not trained by the AHA, ARC, or ASHI themselves, that’s your cue to bail.
  4. How often do you hold class? We hold classes Everyday at Atlanta CPR.
  5. When do I get my Card? Immediately after you complete the Hands on Skills Session.
  6. What if I don’t feel confident after class. Do not worry about that, “Our Confidence will give you Competence”
  7. Equipment – All CPR, ACLS, and PALS require specific equipment. At Atlanta CPR we utilize the most up-to-date manikins, and patient monitoring equipment.
  8. Brayden Pro - is our main Manikin
  9. Little Anne – is also a QCPR Manikin. That men thatvyou can download the QCPR App from the Appstore / Playstore. Open you QCPR Learner app, and push your manikins chest. All of our manikins are interactive.
  10. What about the infant manikins? – Once again, we are at the pinnacle of technology. We utilize Brayden Baby. If you thought Brayden Pro was great, wait until you try out Brayden Baby. You have to experience our new babies to know.
  11. Patient Monitoring System- we utilize the most advanced tech! Dart Sim is by far the most advanced, easiest, sexiest patient monitoring system available.

 

  1. Can I come back for a refresher class, after my initial class. Yes, Atlanta CPR Everyday we encourage students to stop on by, if you’re in the neighborhood. And ironically, we have many, many students pop in and help with the classes, grab a snack, and to spruce up on a few skills.

 

In closing… We know this was a lot to read. But, lifesavers study hard, so we can easily save a lives.

 

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:
1874 Piedmont Road NE Building C Suite 355-C

Atlanta, Ga. 30324
Phone: 404-956-4003

We are both, an American Heart Association Training Site*, and

Proud Provider of American Red Cross First Aid, CPR and AED Training

All Atlanta CPR Instructors are fully credentialed American Heart Association BLS, ACLS, Heartsaver Instructors

The post Don’t Take Any/ Another CPR Training Class Before Reading This is available on ]]> Identifying that CPR training is a very important life-saving skill you should have is a great choice. However, that does not mean diving into the classes head on.

Before you step into the first class at all – or even register for one – here are a couple of things you have to know.

Choosing the right class level

Depending on why you want to learn Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the first place, there are different class levels to consider. While there are some restriction to learning them all, it would be great to start with one that really pertains to what you need to make the best impact.

The various class levels to pick from are:

  • Adult CPR – This Red Cross course covers Adults of about twelve years old to full-blown adults. This is the ideal class for Personal Trainers, , hotel housekeeping, Gym employees, and those tasked with caring for the elderly. For those who have access to a defibrillator as well, you should make sure to let your instructor know so they can teach you about your specific AED Automated External Defibrillator. The entire class should take less than 2 hours and 5 minutes for the whole Blended Learning and Hands on Skills Session.
  • Pediatric and Adult First Aid CPR AED– This Red Cross course covers when you deal with infants 0 days old – 1 years old and children of ages 1year old up to 12 twelve years (girls with budding breasts, and boys with facial and body hair are considered adults), Adults are12 years old and up, this is the class you should go for. This course is perfect for:
  • Physical fitness trainers
  • School Teachers, Child Care Workers , Nannies
  • Security Guards
  • School personnel
  • Tattoo artists
  • Maintenance workers
  • Police and Firefighters
  • Camp Counselors
  • other individuals who want or need first-aid training

 

*The administration of CPR to adults is way different to the approach for infants and children so you should be properly trained to help when need be.*

Basic Life Support – This class teaches medically trained personnel the basic life support for healthcare providers, so the classes are a little more in-depth than the ones above. An American Heart Association BLS Card is required for everyone working in, on, or around a medical team. The American Heart Association BLS (CPR) for Healthcare Provider is intended for:

Healthcare professionals, certified or noncertified, licensed or non-licensed, including:

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physicians Assistants
  • Nursing students, Medical students
  • Nursing Assistants, Medical Assistants
  • Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians
  • Respiratory, Physical, and Occupational Therapists
  • Residents or Fellows
  • Nurse Aides, and other Allied Health Personnel

 

What does the BLS course teach?

  • High-quality CPR for infants, children, and Adults
  • The AHA Chain of Survival, specifically the BLS components
  • Important early use of an AED
  • Effective ventilations using a barrier device and a bag valve mask when needed
  • Importance of teams in multirescuer resuscitation and performance as an effective team member during multirescuer CPR
  • Relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (choking) for adults and infants

 

Advanced Cardiac Life Support – This AHA class teaches the Advanced Cardiac Life Support for healthcare providers, so the classes are much more involved than the BLS course. This is required for everyone working in an advanced medical capacity –

WHO NEEDS THE ACLS CERTIFICATION?

The American Heart Association's HeartCode ACLS Course is intended for healthcare providers who either direct or participate in the resuscitation of an adult patient, whether in or out of the hospital, including:  

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physician's assistants
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Nursing students, Medical Students
  • Paramedics, EMT's
  • Pharmacists
  • Staff in intensive care units and emergency or critical care departments 

The class will take into consideration all Medications, Advanced CPR techniques and other Advanced procedures.

Pediatric Advanced Life Support – PALS for healthcare providers is for those who respond to emergencies in infants and children and for personnel in emergency response, emergency medicine, intensive care and critical care units

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physician's assistants
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Nursing students, Medical Students
  • Paramedics, EMT's
  • Pharmacists

What does this course teach?

The goal of the PALS Course is to improve the quality of care provided to seriously ill or injured infants, and children, resulting in better outcomes. Upon successful completion of all the patient cases, students must pass the multiple-choice exam with a minimum score of 84%. Topics include:

  • High-quality Child CPR AED and Infant CPR
  • Recognition of patients who do and do not require immediate intervention
  • Recognition of cardiopulmonary arrest early and application of CPR within 10 seconds
  • Apply team dynamics
  • Differentiation between respiratory distress and failure
  • Early interventions for respiratory distress and failure
  • Differentiation between compensated and decompensated (hypotensive) shock
  • Early interventions for the treatment of shock
  • Differentiation between unstable and stable patients with arrhythmias
  • Clinical characteristics of instability in patients with arrhythmias
  • Post–cardiac arrest management

These are so really high tech events. PALS is not for everyone, these are truly special people.

 

 

Choosing the right instructor

Your certification is important, no doubt, but not as important as the skill itself. That is why we recommend not only chasing the certificate but the proper knowledge too. That will only be possible if you learn from truly professional, certified, seasoned AHA, ARC Instructors. Our Instructors have varied backgrounds  (Nurses, physicians, EMT’s, and Paramedics in multi faceted emergency care settings.

No matter which level of CPR certification you aim to attain, the instructors at Atlanta CPR are up to the task. Having been doing this in the same spot for about a decade, and receiving a honors from the American Heart Association American Red Cross too, we comply with the current CPR training standards to ensure you’re capable to teaching these life-saving techniques perfectly whenever called upon.

 

Asking the right questions

Before putting your money and time into any CPR training program, you really want to know if it meets your expectations. Here, we expect you to ask questions on the lines of:

  1. Are you AHA / ARC Certified? If so, how long?

           We have instructors that have been certified and teaching for well over 25

  1. Passing The Test – Since there’s a certificate involved for BLS, ACLS, PALS, a test is mandatory for AHA Certification Classes. Likewise, you want to know what to do in case you don’t pass the first time. It’s a multiple choice test. You actually get multiple attempt to pass, until you pass. Just take your time.
  2. Hands on Skill Session – The practical Hands on Skills Session has to be performed with a Certified AHA / ARC Certified instructor.
  3. How good are your instructors– Afterall, no one can give what they don’t have. If the instructors are not certified, or not trained by the AHA, ARC, or ASHI themselves, that’s your cue to bail.
  4. How often do you hold class? We hold classes Everyday at Atlanta CPR.
  5. When do I get my Card? Immediately after you complete the Hands on Skills Session.
  6. What if I don’t feel confident after class. Do not worry about that, “Our Confidence will give you Competence”
  7. Equipment – All CPR, ACLS, and PALS require specific equipment. At Atlanta CPR we utilize the most up-to-date manikins, and patient monitoring equipment.
  8. Brayden Pro - is our main Manikin
  9. Little Anne – is also a QCPR Manikin. That men thatvyou can download the QCPR App from the Appstore / Playstore. Open you QCPR Learner app, and push your manikins chest. All of our manikins are interactive.
  10. What about the infant manikins? – Once again, we are at the pinnacle of technology. We utilize Brayden Baby. If you thought Brayden Pro was great, wait until you try out Brayden Baby. You have to experience our new babies to know.
  11. Patient Monitoring System- we utilize the most advanced tech! Dart Sim is by far the most advanced, easiest, sexiest patient monitoring system available.

 

  1. Can I come back for a refresher class, after my initial class. Yes, Atlanta CPR Everyday we encourage students to stop on by, if you’re in the neighborhood. And ironically, we have many, many students pop in and help with the classes, grab a snack, and to spruce up on a few skills.

 

In closing… We know this was a lot to read. But, lifesavers study hard, so we can easily save a lives.

 

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:
1874 Piedmont Road NE Building C Suite 355-C

Atlanta, Ga. 30324
Phone: 404-956-4003

We are both, an American Heart Association Training Site*, and

Proud Provider of American Red Cross First Aid, CPR and AED Training

All Atlanta CPR Instructors are fully credentialed American Heart Association BLS, ACLS, Heartsaver Instructors

The post Don’t Take Any/ Another CPR Training Class Before Reading This is available on ]]> Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Totally Learn CPR https://atlantacpr.net/cpr/top-5-reasons-why-you-should-totally-learn-cpr/ Tue, 21 Jan 2020 18:55:55 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1205 When many people hear about CPR Certification, it sounds like something that can only be learned in medical school. To others, it is one of the intricacies of the healthcare system which should be left to those who are in that field.

Personally, we don’t believe any of that to be true. In fact, here are some cool reasons why you should consider learning CPR, and actually go for it too.

 

1 Be the Solution

There is a popular saying that goes ‘If you are not a part of the solution, you are a part of the problem.’ Unfortunately, the latter is true for some 97% of the entire US population. Afterall, only about 3% of the entire heads in the country have received CPR training – according to the EMS1.

That means many people would not know what to do in the event of a cardiac arrest, and that would lead to more deaths than should have been.

Speaking of deaths…

 

2 You become a lifesaver

The American Heart Association records that the US sees more than 350,000 cases of cardiac arrests occurring outside of the hospitals on a yearly basis. That is not the scary part, but that 88% of these cases lead to death.

We understand that cardiac arrests can sometimes be irreversibly fatal, but they are not always so. Should CPR-certified personnel be around at any of those times, many of these cardiac arrest-related deaths would have been avoided.

 

3 It is not rocket science

We can not even lie – doctors and nurses are some of the smartest people on the planet. In fact, they are so smart, it can be intimidating. They have ACLS Providers cards. ACLS is Advanced Cardiac Life Support

Guess what, though? You can show them how smart you can be too, when you learn CPR – and you will have no issues learning any of the concepts or administration processes at all.

There are a few levels of CPR Certifications:

  1. CPR- You learn basic life saving skills
  2. First Aid CPR- You learn basic life saving skills and Basic First Aid
  3. BLS – Basic Life Support is CPR for healthcare Providers
  4. ACLS – Advanced Cardiac Life Support is for Advanced healthcare Providers
  5. PALS – Pediatric Advanced Life Support is for Advanced Pediatric healthcare Providers
  6. NALS – Neonatal Advanced Life Support is for Advanced Neonatal healthcare Providers

Thinking you would need a recommendation or prior training from a medical school to properly learn CPR is just wrong thinking. Sign up for a class today and you would find out we are not kidding you.

You may end up doing CPR on a medical team. A medical team consists of six persons: Compressor (does chest compressions), Defibrillator (person who delivers the shock), Airway (gives the breaths with an Ambu Bag), Medications Person (gives the ACLS drugs), Team Leader (usually is a Doctor or Nurse), and a Recorder (writes down the sequence of event during CPR).

 

4 You become smarter too

How do you feel after learning any new thing? Smarter, we believe. That is the same way you would feel as soon as you add CPR to your list of skills.

You now know more than the average person on saving lives in case of a cardiac arrest – or any other related condition. You also become something of a mini-authority on the subject if the discussion ever comes up among your social circle.

 

5 A better resume

You might not know this, but a series of jobs in the non-medical industry are now requiring CPR certification. Even though that might not be on the initial job requirements, it is one of those things hiring managers could look forward to seeing.

Having such on your resume shows that you care about not just yourself, but the lives of everyone else around you. Likewise, you become a better asset to the company since you are considered responsible for not only your personal wellbeing, but instrumental in the wellbeing of everyone else around you at any point in time.

Win-win for you, don’t you think?

 

Wrap Up

Gingered to get your CPR training and BLS Certification too? We’ve got just the right thing for you at Atlanta CPR Everyday. From the daily Basic Life Support BLS (BLS is CPR for healthcare Providers) to ACLS Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS is Doctor / Nurse stuff). CPR procedures to executing it right, our classes provide the right atmosphere to help you gain this important life-saving skill.

The blog post Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Totally Learn CPR See more on: ]]> When many people hear about CPR Certification, it sounds like something that can only be learned in medical school. To others, it is one of the intricacies of the healthcare system which should be left to those who are in that field.

Personally, we don’t believe any of that to be true. In fact, here are some cool reasons why you should consider learning CPR, and actually go for it too.

 

1 Be the Solution

There is a popular saying that goes ‘If you are not a part of the solution, you are a part of the problem.’ Unfortunately, the latter is true for some 97% of the entire US population. Afterall, only about 3% of the entire heads in the country have received CPR training – according to the EMS1.

That means many people would not know what to do in the event of a cardiac arrest, and that would lead to more deaths than should have been.

Speaking of deaths…

 

2 You become a lifesaver

The American Heart Association records that the US sees more than 350,000 cases of cardiac arrests occurring outside of the hospitals on a yearly basis. That is not the scary part, but that 88% of these cases lead to death.

We understand that cardiac arrests can sometimes be irreversibly fatal, but they are not always so. Should CPR-certified personnel be around at any of those times, many of these cardiac arrest-related deaths would have been avoided.

 

3 It is not rocket science

We can not even lie – doctors and nurses are some of the smartest people on the planet. In fact, they are so smart, it can be intimidating. They have ACLS Providers cards. ACLS is Advanced Cardiac Life Support

Guess what, though? You can show them how smart you can be too, when you learn CPR – and you will have no issues learning any of the concepts or administration processes at all.

There are a few levels of CPR Certifications:

  1. CPR- You learn basic life saving skills
  2. First Aid CPR- You learn basic life saving skills and Basic First Aid
  3. BLS – Basic Life Support is CPR for healthcare Providers
  4. ACLS – Advanced Cardiac Life Support is for Advanced healthcare Providers
  5. PALS – Pediatric Advanced Life Support is for Advanced Pediatric healthcare Providers
  6. NALS – Neonatal Advanced Life Support is for Advanced Neonatal healthcare Providers

Thinking you would need a recommendation or prior training from a medical school to properly learn CPR is just wrong thinking. Sign up for a class today and you would find out we are not kidding you.

You may end up doing CPR on a medical team. A medical team consists of six persons: Compressor (does chest compressions), Defibrillator (person who delivers the shock), Airway (gives the breaths with an Ambu Bag), Medications Person (gives the ACLS drugs), Team Leader (usually is a Doctor or Nurse), and a Recorder (writes down the sequence of event during CPR).

 

4 You become smarter too

How do you feel after learning any new thing? Smarter, we believe. That is the same way you would feel as soon as you add CPR to your list of skills.

You now know more than the average person on saving lives in case of a cardiac arrest – or any other related condition. You also become something of a mini-authority on the subject if the discussion ever comes up among your social circle.

 

5 A better resume

You might not know this, but a series of jobs in the non-medical industry are now requiring CPR certification. Even though that might not be on the initial job requirements, it is one of those things hiring managers could look forward to seeing.

Having such on your resume shows that you care about not just yourself, but the lives of everyone else around you. Likewise, you become a better asset to the company since you are considered responsible for not only your personal wellbeing, but instrumental in the wellbeing of everyone else around you at any point in time.

Win-win for you, don’t you think?

 

Wrap Up

Gingered to get your CPR training and BLS Certification too? We’ve got just the right thing for you at Atlanta CPR Everyday. From the daily Basic Life Support BLS (BLS is CPR for healthcare Providers) to ACLS Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS is Doctor / Nurse stuff). CPR procedures to executing it right, our classes provide the right atmosphere to help you gain this important life-saving skill.

The blog post Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Totally Learn CPR See more on: ]]> COVID-19 and Adult CPR https://atlantacpr.net/aha-cpr/covid-19-and-adult-cpr/ Tue, 14 Apr 2020 16:03:23 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1389 COVID-19 and Adult CPR

If an adult’s heart stops and you’re worried that they may have COVID-19, you can still help by performing Hands-Only CPR.

Step 1. Phone 9-1-1 and get an AED

Step 2. Cover your own mouth and nose with a face mask or cloth.

Cover the person’s mouth and nose with a face mask or cloth.

Step 3. Perform Hands-Only CPR. Push hard and fast on the center of the chest at a rate of 100 to 120 compressionsper minute.

Step 4. Use an AED as soon as it is available.

4/2020 American Heart Association

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6haAqqeoNk_wWri8ZPYWpQ?sub_confirmation=1

Check our classes at Atlanta CPR Everyday: https://atlantacpr.net/ Find out more about our class schedule:

https://atlantacpr.enrollware.com/schedule Check our location here: https://atlantacpr.net/about/ Visit our latest blog:

https://atlantacpr.net/blog/

We are an American Heart Association CPR Training Site*

BLS – Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, Infant CPR, ACLS – Advanced Cardiac Life Support, First Aid CPR AED, Red Cross Adult and Pediatric First Aid and CPR Certification

*Our curriculum is established by The American Heart Association.

Get your AHA eCard at the end of class!

Check our class calendar here: https://atlantacpr.enrollware.com/calendar

Visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/atlantacpr

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:

1874 Piedmont Road NE

Building C Suite 355-C

Atlanta, Ga. 30324

Phone: 404-956-4003

COVID-19 and Adult CPR was originally published on ]]> COVID-19 and Adult CPR

If an adult’s heart stops and you’re worried that they may have COVID-19, you can still help by performing Hands-Only CPR.

Step 1. Phone 9-1-1 and get an AED

Step 2. Cover your own mouth and nose with a face mask or cloth.

Cover the person’s mouth and nose with a face mask or cloth.

Step 3. Perform Hands-Only CPR. Push hard and fast on the center of the chest at a rate of 100 to 120 compressionsper minute.

Step 4. Use an AED as soon as it is available.

4/2020 American Heart Association

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6haAqqeoNk_wWri8ZPYWpQ?sub_confirmation=1

Check our classes at Atlanta CPR Everyday: https://atlantacpr.net/ Find out more about our class schedule:

https://atlantacpr.enrollware.com/schedule Check our location here: https://atlantacpr.net/about/ Visit our latest blog:

https://atlantacpr.net/blog/

We are an American Heart Association CPR Training Site*

BLS – Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, Infant CPR, ACLS – Advanced Cardiac Life Support, First Aid CPR AED, Red Cross Adult and Pediatric First Aid and CPR Certification

*Our curriculum is established by The American Heart Association.

Get your AHA eCard at the end of class!

Check our class calendar here: https://atlantacpr.enrollware.com/calendar

Visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/atlantacpr

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:

1874 Piedmont Road NE

Building C Suite 355-C

Atlanta, Ga. 30324

Phone: 404-956-4003

COVID-19 and Adult CPR was originally published on ]]> AHA Child and Infant CPR Steps Covid-19 | Atlanta CPR https://atlantacpr.net/aha-cpr/aha-child-cpr-steps-covid-19-atlanta-cpr/ Tue, 14 Apr 2020 01:52:38 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1392 The American Heart Association

COVID-19 and Child and Infant CPR

If a child or an infant’s heart stops and you’re worried that they may have COVID-19, you can still help

Step 1
Make sure the scene is safe.

Check to see if the child or infant is awake and breathing normally.

Step 2
Shout for help.

If you’re alone,phone 9-1-1 from a cell phone, perform CPR with 30 compressions and then 2 breaths

(if you’re willing and able) for 5 cycles, and get an AED.

If help is available, phone 9-1-1. Send someone to get an AED
while you start CPR.

Step 3
Provide CPR with compressions and breaths (if you’re willing and able).

■ Start child CPR Push on the middle of the chest 30 times at a
depth of 2 inches with 1 or 2 hands.Provide 30 compressions and then 2 breaths. Repeat cycles.

■ Start infant CPR Push on the middle of the chest 30 times at a
depth of one and a half inches with 2 fingers.Provide 30 compressions and then 2 breaths. Repeat cycles.
Use the AED as soon as it arrives. Continue CPR until EMS arrives.

4/2020 American Heart Association

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6haAqqeoNk_wWri8ZPYWpQ?sub_confirmation=1
Check our classes at Atlanta CPR Everyday: https://atlantacpr.net/

Find out more about our class schedule: https://atlantacpr.enrollware.com/schedule

Check our location here: https://atlantacpr.net/about/ Visit our latest blog:
https://atlantacpr.net/blog/

We are an American Heart Association CPR Training Site* BLS – Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, Infant CPR, ACLS – Advanced Cardiac Life Support, First Aid CPR AED, Heartsaver Pediatric First Aid and CPR Certification *Our curriculum is established by The American Heart Association. Get your AHA eCard at the end of class!

Check our class calendar here: https://atlantacpr.enrollware.com/calendar

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Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:
1874 Piedmont Road NE
Building C Suite 355-C
Atlanta, Ga. 30324
Phone: 404-956-4003

AHA Child and Infant CPR Steps Covid-19 | Atlanta CPR was originally published on ]]> The American Heart Association

COVID-19 and Child and Infant CPR

If a child or an infant’s heart stops and you’re worried that they may have COVID-19, you can still help

Step 1
Make sure the scene is safe.

Check to see if the child or infant is awake and breathing normally.

Step 2
Shout for help.

If you’re alone,phone 9-1-1 from a cell phone, perform CPR with 30 compressions and then 2 breaths

(if you’re willing and able) for 5 cycles, and get an AED.

If help is available, phone 9-1-1. Send someone to get an AED
while you start CPR.

Step 3
Provide CPR with compressions and breaths (if you’re willing and able).

■ Start child CPR Push on the middle of the chest 30 times at a
depth of 2 inches with 1 or 2 hands.Provide 30 compressions and then 2 breaths. Repeat cycles.

■ Start infant CPR Push on the middle of the chest 30 times at a
depth of one and a half inches with 2 fingers.Provide 30 compressions and then 2 breaths. Repeat cycles.
Use the AED as soon as it arrives. Continue CPR until EMS arrives.

4/2020 American Heart Association

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6haAqqeoNk_wWri8ZPYWpQ?sub_confirmation=1
Check our classes at Atlanta CPR Everyday: https://atlantacpr.net/

Find out more about our class schedule: https://atlantacpr.enrollware.com/schedule

Check our location here: https://atlantacpr.net/about/ Visit our latest blog:
https://atlantacpr.net/blog/

We are an American Heart Association CPR Training Site* BLS – Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, Infant CPR, ACLS – Advanced Cardiac Life Support, First Aid CPR AED, Heartsaver Pediatric First Aid and CPR Certification *Our curriculum is established by The American Heart Association. Get your AHA eCard at the end of class!

Check our class calendar here: https://atlantacpr.enrollware.com/calendar

Visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/atlantacpr

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:
1874 Piedmont Road NE
Building C Suite 355-C
Atlanta, Ga. 30324
Phone: 404-956-4003

AHA Child and Infant CPR Steps Covid-19 | Atlanta CPR was originally published on ]]> ACLS Certification Requirements and Tips https://atlantacpr.net/acls/acls-certification-requirements-and-tips/ Sat, 05 Oct 2019 00:20:11 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1110 The ACLS or Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support certification course is a course that is designed to ensure that health-care professionals are up to date with the latest best practices and that they are confident in how to apply life-saving techniques.

Accepted best-practices for life support are always changing based on new evidence and medical developments, and as such it is important that health care professionals engage in continuing professional development and renew their ACLS certifications every two years.

Who Needs the ACLS?

The ACLS course goes far beyond the content of the BLS (Basic Life Support) course and is useful for any health care professionals who are likely to need to provide life support in a cardiopulmonary emergency. The BLS course is sufficient for those who are not likely to be the primary caregiver or decisionmaker in a cardiac situation, while the ACLS provides medical professionals with the tools, knowledge, and confidence to make those critical decisions.

What Does the ACLS Certification Cover?

The ACLS certification content includes:

- Recap of the BLS primary survey
- Details of the ACLS secondary survey, along with critical action points
- How team dynamics can impact on resuscitation efforts
- Clinical situations where the OA and APC adjuncts may be required for airway management, and when bag-mask ventilation or advanced airway adjuncts should be used instead
- What VF and VT look like and how to recognize them on an ECG
- Key indications or contraindications for drugs for pulseless VT and refractory VF, as well as appropriate doses and administration methods
- ACLS initial assessments
- Management algorithms for ACLS
- The 8 Ds in stroke care, and the reason it is crucial that timely action is taken
- How to identify a stroke

How is ACLS Certification Training Delivered?

There are some providers who offer online ACLS certification, however, most courses are delivered in-person, and given the critical nature of the content it makes a lot of sense to take an in-person course so that you can get access to real-time feedback and a chance to engage in some practical examples, group scenarios, and the kind of hands-on dynamic that can only be experienced in a face to face scenario.

Instructor-led training is particularly important for people who have not taken the ACLS before because the content of the course is quite advanced. An instructor-led course can drive home the importance of team dynamics and good communication in crisis situations and can provide better simulations of what should be done during cardiopulmonary arrest and in the crucial post-cardiac arrest phases of care.

Does the ACLS Certification Expire?

The ACLS certification is valid for two years. After that, professionals are required to re-test to ensure that their skills are current. There are a number of options for recertification. Some people like to take the whole course again, while others may consider looking for a provider that offers a recap and retest option. Alternatively, there is the ACLS for Experienced providers, which is an expanded version of the course which offers additional content to help health care providers improve outcomes in more complex situations, such as metabolic issues and toxicologic emergencies.

When you pass the certification, you will be sent a card and certificate which indicates the version of the certification you passed and who the training provider was. Make sure that you use a training provider that is approved by the institution that you work for or that you are planning to seek employment with. Most institutions accept most training providers, however, it pays to confirm that the provider you want to use is on the approved list.

The expiration date for your course will be listed on your ID card. Be sure to arrange re-certification before your qualification expires.

Blended Learning Options

Some experienced health care providers use blended learning to re-certify. With this, some of the academic parts of the certification are studied in a self-directed fashion, while there are hands-on training sessions for CPR skills and for psychomotor skills. Even the online parts of many courses now offer simulations to allow healthcare professionals to perform simulated treatments. There is still no substitute for real, hands-on training, however.

Is the ACLS For Me?

If you are unsure about which course to take, then you should consider your current background and the type of medical work that you do. A background in healthcare is important before embarking on the ACLS, but no prior knowledge is required for the BLS. You can simply take that course and it will provide you with a basic grounding in field lifesaving skills. The ACLS, on the other hand, assumes some knowledge of BLS and also assumes some other basic medical knowledge.

The BLS does not deal with administering drugs, but the ACLS will introduce you to a number of lifesaving drugs and explain which scenarios they are useful for. Both BLS and ACLS cover the use of an automated external defibrillator, and ACLS also covers how to read an understand ECG results. ACLS training is intended for people who will be working in hospitals, not for the general public.

Study Tips for the ACLS

The ACLS is an in-depth course, and the certification offers training for what to do in situations where lives genuinely are at stake. Mistakes in administering drugs or following protocols could be fatal, so the standards required to pass the course are high.

When studying for the ACLS, make sure that you understand the case scenarios and exactly why certain decisions were made.

Memorize the algorithms for PEA, V-Tach, Tachycardia, Asystole and Bradycardia, as well as other scenarios, and make sure that you know the medications and doses off by heart. There are many mnemonic devices that can help with this; some of the mnemonics are not safe for work. Ask your tutor about them, because those humorous ones will often stick in your mind better than the boring textbook examples!

Learn to read ECGs, and practice on test examples as often as you can. Try to get to the stage where you are so confident that the exam is a breeze; after all, you will be using your skills in situations far more important than "just taking a test" should you pass!

ACLS Certification Requirements and Tips Read more on: ]]> The ACLS or Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support certification course is a course that is designed to ensure that health-care professionals are up to date with the latest best practices and that they are confident in how to apply life-saving techniques.

Accepted best-practices for life support are always changing based on new evidence and medical developments, and as such it is important that health care professionals engage in continuing professional development and renew their ACLS certifications every two years.

Who Needs the ACLS?

The ACLS course goes far beyond the content of the BLS (Basic Life Support) course and is useful for any health care professionals who are likely to need to provide life support in a cardiopulmonary emergency. The BLS course is sufficient for those who are not likely to be the primary caregiver or decisionmaker in a cardiac situation, while the ACLS provides medical professionals with the tools, knowledge, and confidence to make those critical decisions.

What Does the ACLS Certification Cover?

The ACLS certification content includes:

- Recap of the BLS primary survey
- Details of the ACLS secondary survey, along with critical action points
- How team dynamics can impact on resuscitation efforts
- Clinical situations where the OA and APC adjuncts may be required for airway management, and when bag-mask ventilation or advanced airway adjuncts should be used instead
- What VF and VT look like and how to recognize them on an ECG
- Key indications or contraindications for drugs for pulseless VT and refractory VF, as well as appropriate doses and administration methods
- ACLS initial assessments
- Management algorithms for ACLS
- The 8 Ds in stroke care, and the reason it is crucial that timely action is taken
- How to identify a stroke

How is ACLS Certification Training Delivered?

There are some providers who offer online ACLS certification, however, most courses are delivered in-person, and given the critical nature of the content it makes a lot of sense to take an in-person course so that you can get access to real-time feedback and a chance to engage in some practical examples, group scenarios, and the kind of hands-on dynamic that can only be experienced in a face to face scenario.

Instructor-led training is particularly important for people who have not taken the ACLS before because the content of the course is quite advanced. An instructor-led course can drive home the importance of team dynamics and good communication in crisis situations and can provide better simulations of what should be done during cardiopulmonary arrest and in the crucial post-cardiac arrest phases of care.

Does the ACLS Certification Expire?

The ACLS certification is valid for two years. After that, professionals are required to re-test to ensure that their skills are current. There are a number of options for recertification. Some people like to take the whole course again, while others may consider looking for a provider that offers a recap and retest option. Alternatively, there is the ACLS for Experienced providers, which is an expanded version of the course which offers additional content to help health care providers improve outcomes in more complex situations, such as metabolic issues and toxicologic emergencies.

When you pass the certification, you will be sent a card and certificate which indicates the version of the certification you passed and who the training provider was. Make sure that you use a training provider that is approved by the institution that you work for or that you are planning to seek employment with. Most institutions accept most training providers, however, it pays to confirm that the provider you want to use is on the approved list.

The expiration date for your course will be listed on your ID card. Be sure to arrange re-certification before your qualification expires.

Blended Learning Options

Some experienced health care providers use blended learning to re-certify. With this, some of the academic parts of the certification are studied in a self-directed fashion, while there are hands-on training sessions for CPR skills and for psychomotor skills. Even the online parts of many courses now offer simulations to allow healthcare professionals to perform simulated treatments. There is still no substitute for real, hands-on training, however.

Is the ACLS For Me?

If you are unsure about which course to take, then you should consider your current background and the type of medical work that you do. A background in healthcare is important before embarking on the ACLS, but no prior knowledge is required for the BLS. You can simply take that course and it will provide you with a basic grounding in field lifesaving skills. The ACLS, on the other hand, assumes some knowledge of BLS and also assumes some other basic medical knowledge.

The BLS does not deal with administering drugs, but the ACLS will introduce you to a number of lifesaving drugs and explain which scenarios they are useful for. Both BLS and ACLS cover the use of an automated external defibrillator, and ACLS also covers how to read an understand ECG results. ACLS training is intended for people who will be working in hospitals, not for the general public.

Study Tips for the ACLS

The ACLS is an in-depth course, and the certification offers training for what to do in situations where lives genuinely are at stake. Mistakes in administering drugs or following protocols could be fatal, so the standards required to pass the course are high.

When studying for the ACLS, make sure that you understand the case scenarios and exactly why certain decisions were made.

Memorize the algorithms for PEA, V-Tach, Tachycardia, Asystole and Bradycardia, as well as other scenarios, and make sure that you know the medications and doses off by heart. There are many mnemonic devices that can help with this; some of the mnemonics are not safe for work. Ask your tutor about them, because those humorous ones will often stick in your mind better than the boring textbook examples!

Learn to read ECGs, and practice on test examples as often as you can. Try to get to the stage where you are so confident that the exam is a breeze; after all, you will be using your skills in situations far more important than "just taking a test" should you pass!

ACLS Certification Requirements and Tips Read more on: ]]>