Atlanta CPR Training & Certification - Feed https://atlantacpr.net 1 Hour BLS Class Everyday Fri, 21 Feb 2020 17:24:55 +0000 en-US The Heart Block Story https://atlantacpr.net/acls/the-heart-block-story/ Wed, 19 Feb 2020 18:46:48 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1224  

The Heart Block Story is how many, many, people have remembered how to recognize the four heart blocks after ACLS Class. Here we go....

Normal Sinus Rhythm. The wife (P wave) waits at home for the husband (QRS). yeah and The husband (QRS) comes home on time every night.

 

1st Degree AV Block. The wife (P wave) is waiting at home. And The husband (QRS) comes home late every night, but he always comes home though and it’s at the same time every night.

 

2nd Degree Block Type one (Wenckebach). The wife (P wave) is waiting at home. The husband (QRS) comes home later and later every night until one night he doesn't come at all. Note. husband (QRS) must come home at least 2 nights in a row to see this pattern

 

Okay 2nd degree AV block type two. The wife (P wave) is waiting at home. Sometimes the husband (QRS) comes home, sometimes he doesn't., When he does come home, it’s always at the same time. Okay Note. this is usually more serious than type I (Wenckebach) and will sometimes require counseling (pacing).

 

The 3rd degree AV block. Wife (P wave) is no longer waiting at home. She and her husband (QRS) are now both on separate schedules and have no relationship and they are no longer talking. Each spouse has a regular, individual schedule. Note. this frequently requires counseling in the form of a temporary or permanent pacer.

 

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:
1874 Piedmont Road NE Building C Suite 355-C
Atlanta, Ga. 30324
Phone: 404-956-4003

We are both, an American Heart Association Training Site*, and

Proud Provider of American Red Cross First Aid, CPR and AED Training

 

 

The following blog post The Heart Block Story is republished from ]]>  

The Heart Block Story is how many, many, people have remembered how to recognize the four heart blocks after ACLS Class. Here we go....

Normal Sinus Rhythm. The wife (P wave) waits at home for the husband (QRS). yeah and The husband (QRS) comes home on time every night.

 

1st Degree AV Block. The wife (P wave) is waiting at home. And The husband (QRS) comes home late every night, but he always comes home though and it’s at the same time every night.

 

2nd Degree Block Type one (Wenckebach). The wife (P wave) is waiting at home. The husband (QRS) comes home later and later every night until one night he doesn't come at all. Note. husband (QRS) must come home at least 2 nights in a row to see this pattern

 

Okay 2nd degree AV block type two. The wife (P wave) is waiting at home. Sometimes the husband (QRS) comes home, sometimes he doesn't., When he does come home, it’s always at the same time. Okay Note. this is usually more serious than type I (Wenckebach) and will sometimes require counseling (pacing).

 

The 3rd degree AV block. Wife (P wave) is no longer waiting at home. She and her husband (QRS) are now both on separate schedules and have no relationship and they are no longer talking. Each spouse has a regular, individual schedule. Note. this frequently requires counseling in the form of a temporary or permanent pacer.

 

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:
1874 Piedmont Road NE Building C Suite 355-C
Atlanta, Ga. 30324
Phone: 404-956-4003

We are both, an American Heart Association Training Site*, and

Proud Provider of American Red Cross First Aid, CPR and AED Training

 

 

The following blog post The Heart Block Story is republished from ]]> Don’t Take Any/ Another CPR Training Class Before Reading This https://atlantacpr.net/cpr/dont-take-any-another-cpr-training-class-before-reading-this/ Mon, 17 Feb 2020 14:23:34 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1218 Identifying that CPR training is a very important life-saving skill you should have is a great choice. However, that does not mean diving into the classes head on.

Before you step into the first class at all – or even register for one – here are a couple of things you have to know.

Choosing the right class level

Depending on why you want to learn Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the first place, there are different class levels to consider. While there are some restriction to learning them all, it would be great to start with one that really pertains to what you need to make the best impact.

The various class levels to pick from are:

  • Adult CPR – This Red Cross course covers Adults of about twelve years old to full-blown adults. This is the ideal class for Personal Trainers, , hotel housekeeping, Gym employees, and those tasked with caring for the elderly. For those who have access to a defibrillator as well, you should make sure to let your instructor know so they can teach you about your specific AED Automated External Defibrillator. The entire class should take less than 2 hours and 5 minutes for the whole Blended Learning and Hands on Skills Session.
  • Pediatric and Adult First Aid CPR AED– This Red Cross course covers when you deal with infants 0 days old – 1 years old and children of ages 1year old up to 12 twelve years (girls with budding breasts, and boys with facial and body hair are considered adults), Adults are12 years old and up, this is the class you should go for. This course is perfect for:
  • Physical fitness trainers
  • School Teachers, Child Care Workers , Nannies
  • Security Guards
  • School personnel
  • Tattoo artists
  • Maintenance workers
  • Police and Firefighters
  • Camp Counselors
  • other individuals who want or need first-aid training

 

*The administration of CPR to adults is way different to the approach for infants and children so you should be properly trained to help when need be.*

Basic Life Support – This class teaches medically trained personnel the basic life support for healthcare providers, so the classes are a little more in-depth than the ones above. An American Heart Association BLS Card is required for everyone working in, on, or around a medical team. The American Heart Association BLS (CPR) for Healthcare Provider is intended for:

Healthcare professionals, certified or noncertified, licensed or non-licensed, including:

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physicians Assistants
  • Nursing students, Medical students
  • Nursing Assistants, Medical Assistants
  • Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians
  • Respiratory, Physical, and Occupational Therapists
  • Residents or Fellows
  • Nurse Aides, and other Allied Health Personnel

 

What does the BLS course teach?

  • High-quality CPR for infants, children, and Adults
  • The AHA Chain of Survival, specifically the BLS components
  • Important early use of an AED
  • Effective ventilations using a barrier device and a bag valve mask when needed
  • Importance of teams in multirescuer resuscitation and performance as an effective team member during multirescuer CPR
  • Relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (choking) for adults and infants

 

Advanced Cardiac Life Support – This AHA class teaches the Advanced Cardiac Life Support for healthcare providers, so the classes are much more involved than the BLS course. This is required for everyone working in an advanced medical capacity –

WHO NEEDS THE ACLS CERTIFICATION?

The American Heart Association's HeartCode ACLS Course is intended for healthcare providers who either direct or participate in the resuscitation of an adult patient, whether in or out of the hospital, including:  

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physician's assistants
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Nursing students, Medical Students
  • Paramedics, EMT's
  • Pharmacists
  • Staff in intensive care units and emergency or critical care departments 

The class will take into consideration all Medications, Advanced CPR techniques and other Advanced procedures.

Pediatric Advanced Life Support – PALS for healthcare providers is for those who respond to emergencies in infants and children and for personnel in emergency response, emergency medicine, intensive care and critical care units

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physician's assistants
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Nursing students, Medical Students
  • Paramedics, EMT's
  • Pharmacists

What does this course teach?

The goal of the PALS Course is to improve the quality of care provided to seriously ill or injured infants, and children, resulting in better outcomes. Upon successful completion of all the patient cases, students must pass the multiple-choice exam with a minimum score of 84%. Topics include:

  • High-quality Child CPR AED and Infant CPR
  • Recognition of patients who do and do not require immediate intervention
  • Recognition of cardiopulmonary arrest early and application of CPR within 10 seconds
  • Apply team dynamics
  • Differentiation between respiratory distress and failure
  • Early interventions for respiratory distress and failure
  • Differentiation between compensated and decompensated (hypotensive) shock
  • Early interventions for the treatment of shock
  • Differentiation between unstable and stable patients with arrhythmias
  • Clinical characteristics of instability in patients with arrhythmias
  • Post–cardiac arrest management

These are so really high tech events. PALS is not for everyone, these are truly special people.

 

 

Choosing the right instructor

Your certification is important, no doubt, but not as important as the skill itself. That is why we recommend not only chasing the certificate but the proper knowledge too. That will only be possible if you learn from truly professional, certified, seasoned AHA, ARC Instructors. Our Instructors have varied backgrounds  (Nurses, physicians, EMT’s, and Paramedics in multi faceted emergency care settings.

No matter which level of CPR certification you aim to attain, the instructors at Atlanta CPR are up to the task. Having been doing this in the same spot for about a decade, and receiving a honors from the American Heart Association American Red Cross too, we comply with the current CPR training standards to ensure you’re capable to teaching these life-saving techniques perfectly whenever called upon.

 

Asking the right questions

Before putting your money and time into any CPR training program, you really want to know if it meets your expectations. Here, we expect you to ask questions on the lines of:

  1. Are you AHA / ARC Certified? If so, how long?

           We have instructors that have been certified and teaching for well over 25

  1. Passing The Test – Since there’s a certificate involved for BLS, ACLS, PALS, a test is mandatory for AHA Certification Classes. Likewise, you want to know what to do in case you don’t pass the first time. It’s a multiple choice test. You actually get multiple attempt to pass, until you pass. Just take your time.
  2. Hands on Skill Session – The practical Hands on Skills Session has to be performed with a Certified AHA / ARC Certified instructor.
  3. How good are your instructors– Afterall, no one can give what they don’t have. If the instructors are not certified, or not trained by the AHA, ARC, or ASHI themselves, that’s your cue to bail.
  4. How often do you hold class? We hold classes Everyday at Atlanta CPR.
  5. When do I get my Card? Immediately after you complete the Hands on Skills Session.
  6. What if I don’t feel confident after class. Do not worry about that, “Our Confidence will give you Competence”
  7. Equipment – All CPR, ACLS, and PALS require specific equipment. At Atlanta CPR we utilize the most up-to-date manikins, and patient monitoring equipment.
  8. Brayden Pro - is our main Manikin
  9. Little Anne – is also a QCPR Manikin. That men thatvyou can download the QCPR App from the Appstore / Playstore. Open you QCPR Learner app, and push your manikins chest. All of our manikins are interactive.
  10. What about the infant manikins? – Once again, we are at the pinnacle of technology. We utilize Brayden Baby. If you thought Brayden Pro was great, wait until you try out Brayden Baby. You have to experience our new babies to know.
  11. Patient Monitoring System- we utilize the most advanced tech! Dart Sim is by far the most advanced, easiest, sexiest patient monitoring system available.

 

  1. Can I come back for a refresher class, after my initial class. Yes, Atlanta CPR Everyday we encourage students to stop on by, if you’re in the neighborhood. And ironically, we have many, many students pop in and help with the classes, grab a snack, and to spruce up on a few skills.

 

In closing… We know this was a lot to read. But, lifesavers study hard, so we can easily save a lives.

 

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:
1874 Piedmont Road NE Building C Suite 355-C

Atlanta, Ga. 30324
Phone: 404-956-4003

We are both, an American Heart Association Training Site*, and

Proud Provider of American Red Cross First Aid, CPR and AED Training

All Atlanta CPR Instructors are fully credentialed American Heart Association BLS, ACLS, Heartsaver Instructors

The blog post Don’t Take Any/ Another CPR Training Class Before Reading This is courtesy of ]]> Identifying that CPR training is a very important life-saving skill you should have is a great choice. However, that does not mean diving into the classes head on.

Before you step into the first class at all – or even register for one – here are a couple of things you have to know.

Choosing the right class level

Depending on why you want to learn Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the first place, there are different class levels to consider. While there are some restriction to learning them all, it would be great to start with one that really pertains to what you need to make the best impact.

The various class levels to pick from are:

  • Adult CPR – This Red Cross course covers Adults of about twelve years old to full-blown adults. This is the ideal class for Personal Trainers, , hotel housekeeping, Gym employees, and those tasked with caring for the elderly. For those who have access to a defibrillator as well, you should make sure to let your instructor know so they can teach you about your specific AED Automated External Defibrillator. The entire class should take less than 2 hours and 5 minutes for the whole Blended Learning and Hands on Skills Session.
  • Pediatric and Adult First Aid CPR AED– This Red Cross course covers when you deal with infants 0 days old – 1 years old and children of ages 1year old up to 12 twelve years (girls with budding breasts, and boys with facial and body hair are considered adults), Adults are12 years old and up, this is the class you should go for. This course is perfect for:
  • Physical fitness trainers
  • School Teachers, Child Care Workers , Nannies
  • Security Guards
  • School personnel
  • Tattoo artists
  • Maintenance workers
  • Police and Firefighters
  • Camp Counselors
  • other individuals who want or need first-aid training

 

*The administration of CPR to adults is way different to the approach for infants and children so you should be properly trained to help when need be.*

Basic Life Support – This class teaches medically trained personnel the basic life support for healthcare providers, so the classes are a little more in-depth than the ones above. An American Heart Association BLS Card is required for everyone working in, on, or around a medical team. The American Heart Association BLS (CPR) for Healthcare Provider is intended for:

Healthcare professionals, certified or noncertified, licensed or non-licensed, including:

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physicians Assistants
  • Nursing students, Medical students
  • Nursing Assistants, Medical Assistants
  • Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians
  • Respiratory, Physical, and Occupational Therapists
  • Residents or Fellows
  • Nurse Aides, and other Allied Health Personnel

 

What does the BLS course teach?

  • High-quality CPR for infants, children, and Adults
  • The AHA Chain of Survival, specifically the BLS components
  • Important early use of an AED
  • Effective ventilations using a barrier device and a bag valve mask when needed
  • Importance of teams in multirescuer resuscitation and performance as an effective team member during multirescuer CPR
  • Relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (choking) for adults and infants

 

Advanced Cardiac Life Support – This AHA class teaches the Advanced Cardiac Life Support for healthcare providers, so the classes are much more involved than the BLS course. This is required for everyone working in an advanced medical capacity –

WHO NEEDS THE ACLS CERTIFICATION?

The American Heart Association's HeartCode ACLS Course is intended for healthcare providers who either direct or participate in the resuscitation of an adult patient, whether in or out of the hospital, including:  

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physician's assistants
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Nursing students, Medical Students
  • Paramedics, EMT's
  • Pharmacists
  • Staff in intensive care units and emergency or critical care departments 

The class will take into consideration all Medications, Advanced CPR techniques and other Advanced procedures.

Pediatric Advanced Life Support – PALS for healthcare providers is for those who respond to emergencies in infants and children and for personnel in emergency response, emergency medicine, intensive care and critical care units

  • Nurses, Nurse Practitioners
  • Physicians, Physician's assistants
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Nursing students, Medical Students
  • Paramedics, EMT's
  • Pharmacists

What does this course teach?

The goal of the PALS Course is to improve the quality of care provided to seriously ill or injured infants, and children, resulting in better outcomes. Upon successful completion of all the patient cases, students must pass the multiple-choice exam with a minimum score of 84%. Topics include:

  • High-quality Child CPR AED and Infant CPR
  • Recognition of patients who do and do not require immediate intervention
  • Recognition of cardiopulmonary arrest early and application of CPR within 10 seconds
  • Apply team dynamics
  • Differentiation between respiratory distress and failure
  • Early interventions for respiratory distress and failure
  • Differentiation between compensated and decompensated (hypotensive) shock
  • Early interventions for the treatment of shock
  • Differentiation between unstable and stable patients with arrhythmias
  • Clinical characteristics of instability in patients with arrhythmias
  • Post–cardiac arrest management

These are so really high tech events. PALS is not for everyone, these are truly special people.

 

 

Choosing the right instructor

Your certification is important, no doubt, but not as important as the skill itself. That is why we recommend not only chasing the certificate but the proper knowledge too. That will only be possible if you learn from truly professional, certified, seasoned AHA, ARC Instructors. Our Instructors have varied backgrounds  (Nurses, physicians, EMT’s, and Paramedics in multi faceted emergency care settings.

No matter which level of CPR certification you aim to attain, the instructors at Atlanta CPR are up to the task. Having been doing this in the same spot for about a decade, and receiving a honors from the American Heart Association American Red Cross too, we comply with the current CPR training standards to ensure you’re capable to teaching these life-saving techniques perfectly whenever called upon.

 

Asking the right questions

Before putting your money and time into any CPR training program, you really want to know if it meets your expectations. Here, we expect you to ask questions on the lines of:

  1. Are you AHA / ARC Certified? If so, how long?

           We have instructors that have been certified and teaching for well over 25

  1. Passing The Test – Since there’s a certificate involved for BLS, ACLS, PALS, a test is mandatory for AHA Certification Classes. Likewise, you want to know what to do in case you don’t pass the first time. It’s a multiple choice test. You actually get multiple attempt to pass, until you pass. Just take your time.
  2. Hands on Skill Session – The practical Hands on Skills Session has to be performed with a Certified AHA / ARC Certified instructor.
  3. How good are your instructors– Afterall, no one can give what they don’t have. If the instructors are not certified, or not trained by the AHA, ARC, or ASHI themselves, that’s your cue to bail.
  4. How often do you hold class? We hold classes Everyday at Atlanta CPR.
  5. When do I get my Card? Immediately after you complete the Hands on Skills Session.
  6. What if I don’t feel confident after class. Do not worry about that, “Our Confidence will give you Competence”
  7. Equipment – All CPR, ACLS, and PALS require specific equipment. At Atlanta CPR we utilize the most up-to-date manikins, and patient monitoring equipment.
  8. Brayden Pro - is our main Manikin
  9. Little Anne – is also a QCPR Manikin. That men thatvyou can download the QCPR App from the Appstore / Playstore. Open you QCPR Learner app, and push your manikins chest. All of our manikins are interactive.
  10. What about the infant manikins? – Once again, we are at the pinnacle of technology. We utilize Brayden Baby. If you thought Brayden Pro was great, wait until you try out Brayden Baby. You have to experience our new babies to know.
  11. Patient Monitoring System- we utilize the most advanced tech! Dart Sim is by far the most advanced, easiest, sexiest patient monitoring system available.

 

  1. Can I come back for a refresher class, after my initial class. Yes, Atlanta CPR Everyday we encourage students to stop on by, if you’re in the neighborhood. And ironically, we have many, many students pop in and help with the classes, grab a snack, and to spruce up on a few skills.

 

In closing… We know this was a lot to read. But, lifesavers study hard, so we can easily save a lives.

 

Atlanta CPR and First Aid is headquartered at:
1874 Piedmont Road NE Building C Suite 355-C

Atlanta, Ga. 30324
Phone: 404-956-4003

We are both, an American Heart Association Training Site*, and

Proud Provider of American Red Cross First Aid, CPR and AED Training

All Atlanta CPR Instructors are fully credentialed American Heart Association BLS, ACLS, Heartsaver Instructors

The blog post Don’t Take Any/ Another CPR Training Class Before Reading This is courtesy of ]]> Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Totally Learn CPR https://atlantacpr.net/cpr/top-5-reasons-why-you-should-totally-learn-cpr/ Tue, 21 Jan 2020 18:55:55 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1205 When many people hear about CPR Certification, it sounds like something that can only be learned in medical school. To others, it is one of the intricacies of the healthcare system which should be left to those who are in that field.

Personally, we don’t believe any of that to be true. In fact, here are some cool reasons why you should consider learning CPR, and actually go for it too.

 

1 Be the Solution

There is a popular saying that goes ‘If you are not a part of the solution, you are a part of the problem.’ Unfortunately, the latter is true for some 97% of the entire US population. Afterall, only about 3% of the entire heads in the country have received CPR training – according to the EMS1.

That means many people would not know what to do in the event of a cardiac arrest, and that would lead to more deaths than should have been.

Speaking of deaths…

 

2 You become a lifesaver

The American Heart Association records that the US sees more than 350,000 cases of cardiac arrests occurring outside of the hospitals on a yearly basis. That is not the scary part, but that 88% of these cases lead to death.

We understand that cardiac arrests can sometimes be irreversibly fatal, but they are not always so. Should CPR-certified personnel be around at any of those times, many of these cardiac arrest-related deaths would have been avoided.

 

3 It is not rocket science

We can not even lie – doctors and nurses are some of the smartest people on the planet. In fact, they are so smart, it can be intimidating. They have ACLS Providers cards. ACLS is Advanced Cardiac Life Support

Guess what, though? You can show them how smart you can be too, when you learn CPR – and you will have no issues learning any of the concepts or administration processes at all.

There are a few levels of CPR Certifications:

  1. CPR- You learn basic life saving skills
  2. First Aid CPR- You learn basic life saving skills and Basic First Aid
  3. BLS – Basic Life Support is CPR for healthcare Providers
  4. ACLS – Advanced Cardiac Life Support is for Advanced healthcare Providers
  5. PALS – Pediatric Advanced Life Support is for Advanced Pediatric healthcare Providers
  6. NALS – Neonatal Advanced Life Support is for Advanced Neonatal healthcare Providers

Thinking you would need a recommendation or prior training from a medical school to properly learn CPR is just wrong thinking. Sign up for a class today and you would find out we are not kidding you.

You may end up doing CPR on a medical team. A medical team consists of six persons: Compressor (does chest compressions), Defibrillator (person who delivers the shock), Airway (gives the breaths with an Ambu Bag), Medications Person (gives the ACLS drugs), Team Leader (usually is a Doctor or Nurse), and a Recorder (writes down the sequence of event during CPR).

 

4 You become smarter too

How do you feel after learning any new thing? Smarter, we believe. That is the same way you would feel as soon as you add CPR to your list of skills.

You now know more than the average person on saving lives in case of a cardiac arrest – or any other related condition. You also become something of a mini-authority on the subject if the discussion ever comes up among your social circle.

 

5 A better resume

You might not know this, but a series of jobs in the non-medical industry are now requiring CPR certification. Even though that might not be on the initial job requirements, it is one of those things hiring managers could look forward to seeing.

Having such on your resume shows that you care about not just yourself, but the lives of everyone else around you. Likewise, you become a better asset to the company since you are considered responsible for not only your personal wellbeing, but instrumental in the wellbeing of everyone else around you at any point in time.

Win-win for you, don’t you think?

 

Wrap Up

Gingered to get your CPR training and BLS Certification too? We’ve got just the right thing for you at Atlanta CPR Everyday. From the daily Basic Life Support BLS (BLS is CPR for healthcare Providers) to ACLS Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS is Doctor / Nurse stuff). CPR procedures to executing it right, our classes provide the right atmosphere to help you gain this important life-saving skill.

The following article Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Totally Learn CPR is courtesy of ]]> When many people hear about CPR Certification, it sounds like something that can only be learned in medical school. To others, it is one of the intricacies of the healthcare system which should be left to those who are in that field.

Personally, we don’t believe any of that to be true. In fact, here are some cool reasons why you should consider learning CPR, and actually go for it too.

 

1 Be the Solution

There is a popular saying that goes ‘If you are not a part of the solution, you are a part of the problem.’ Unfortunately, the latter is true for some 97% of the entire US population. Afterall, only about 3% of the entire heads in the country have received CPR training – according to the EMS1.

That means many people would not know what to do in the event of a cardiac arrest, and that would lead to more deaths than should have been.

Speaking of deaths…

 

2 You become a lifesaver

The American Heart Association records that the US sees more than 350,000 cases of cardiac arrests occurring outside of the hospitals on a yearly basis. That is not the scary part, but that 88% of these cases lead to death.

We understand that cardiac arrests can sometimes be irreversibly fatal, but they are not always so. Should CPR-certified personnel be around at any of those times, many of these cardiac arrest-related deaths would have been avoided.

 

3 It is not rocket science

We can not even lie – doctors and nurses are some of the smartest people on the planet. In fact, they are so smart, it can be intimidating. They have ACLS Providers cards. ACLS is Advanced Cardiac Life Support

Guess what, though? You can show them how smart you can be too, when you learn CPR – and you will have no issues learning any of the concepts or administration processes at all.

There are a few levels of CPR Certifications:

  1. CPR- You learn basic life saving skills
  2. First Aid CPR- You learn basic life saving skills and Basic First Aid
  3. BLS – Basic Life Support is CPR for healthcare Providers
  4. ACLS – Advanced Cardiac Life Support is for Advanced healthcare Providers
  5. PALS – Pediatric Advanced Life Support is for Advanced Pediatric healthcare Providers
  6. NALS – Neonatal Advanced Life Support is for Advanced Neonatal healthcare Providers

Thinking you would need a recommendation or prior training from a medical school to properly learn CPR is just wrong thinking. Sign up for a class today and you would find out we are not kidding you.

You may end up doing CPR on a medical team. A medical team consists of six persons: Compressor (does chest compressions), Defibrillator (person who delivers the shock), Airway (gives the breaths with an Ambu Bag), Medications Person (gives the ACLS drugs), Team Leader (usually is a Doctor or Nurse), and a Recorder (writes down the sequence of event during CPR).

 

4 You become smarter too

How do you feel after learning any new thing? Smarter, we believe. That is the same way you would feel as soon as you add CPR to your list of skills.

You now know more than the average person on saving lives in case of a cardiac arrest – or any other related condition. You also become something of a mini-authority on the subject if the discussion ever comes up among your social circle.

 

5 A better resume

You might not know this, but a series of jobs in the non-medical industry are now requiring CPR certification. Even though that might not be on the initial job requirements, it is one of those things hiring managers could look forward to seeing.

Having such on your resume shows that you care about not just yourself, but the lives of everyone else around you. Likewise, you become a better asset to the company since you are considered responsible for not only your personal wellbeing, but instrumental in the wellbeing of everyone else around you at any point in time.

Win-win for you, don’t you think?

 

Wrap Up

Gingered to get your CPR training and BLS Certification too? We’ve got just the right thing for you at Atlanta CPR Everyday. From the daily Basic Life Support BLS (BLS is CPR for healthcare Providers) to ACLS Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS is Doctor / Nurse stuff). CPR procedures to executing it right, our classes provide the right atmosphere to help you gain this important life-saving skill.

The following article Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Totally Learn CPR is courtesy of ]]> What Is A BLS Certification And How Can You Get One? https://atlantacpr.net/bls/what-is-a-bls-certification-and-how-can-you-get-one/ Sat, 05 Oct 2019 00:22:45 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1109 A Basic Life Services Certificate, or BLS certification, is a necessary step on the path to becoming a live-in caregiver. It's also a prerequisite for many other occupations, including physicians, firefighters, nurses, and various other healthcare providers.

Some certification courses are designed and taught by the American Red Cross with final approval coming from their scientific advisory council. There are also alternative certifications available from the American Heart Health Association as well as other third-party providers.

If you're pursuing a career as a live-in healthcare provider, then you've probably run into this term multiple times. You may even be wondering if it's any different from the CPR certification that you've already received. Following is a breakdown of exactly what this certification is, how it differs from CPR certifications, and how you can receive your BLS certification as quickly as possible.

An Introduction To Basic Life Services

BLS courses cover a lot of material ranging from the proper use of bag valve masks to how to perform two-person CPR. In truth, much of what is covered is the same material that would be covered in a CPR course. For that reason, BLS is often referred to as “Healthcare Provider Level CPR”.

This simply means it includes all of the basic CPR material in addition to a small amount of advanced material that would really only be useful to a healthcare provider. An average person may take a standard CPR class just to prepare for emergencies, but only someone interested in becoming a healthcare provider would pursue a full BLS course.

BLS may be more advanced than a standard CPR course, but it's not extremely difficult to learn and master. After all, the “B” stands for “Basic”. This is one of the most basic courses and certifications that a healthcare provider can receive. It's also one of the most important. It's nearly impossible to secure a reliable position as a live-in healthcare provider if you haven't received the certification.

One of the primary focuses during the course is the ABCs of survival. ABC stands for airway, breathing, and circulation. The goal is to clear any obstructions from the airways, make sure the lungs are able to fill with air, and ensure that blood is flowing properly through the body.

How Long Does Certification Take?

The good news is that certification is a fairly quick and straightforward process. If you're already CPR certified, then you'll already understand most of the material. Most people can finish the courses within a few hours using either online or a combination of online and in-person classes.

The in-person classes do offer a more hands-on approach for those who are struggling, but if you're comfortable with the material, then finishing the course online can be more convenient.

The in-person classes use a medical dummy to teach basic techniques and procedures. Again, the structure of the class and the teaching methods will all seem very familiar if you have your CPR certification. If you don't have your CPR certification, then you should definitely attend the class in-person and familiarize yourself with these life-saving techniques using the medical dummy.

Organizations That Offer BLS Certification

The two major organizations that offer BLS certifications are the American Heart Health Association(AHHA) and the American Red Cross(ARC). Both courses are very similar and the certification they provide will work equally well, but they each still have their advantages.

The course available from the Red Cross is called BLS/CPR For Healthcare. Courses are available in cities throughout the country. Completing the course and passing the exam will earn you a BLS certification card. The card and the certification will last for two years from the date of certification.

Keeping your certification up to date is very important if you work in a healthcare profession. You can seek re-certification starting thirty days from the expiration date of the card. As long as you seek certification within thirty days of the expiration date you will not need to take the full BLS course again. Instead, you will take an abbreviated review course which grants certification for an additional two years.

Certification from the Red Cross is visible on the card as well as their website. Potential employers can visit the Red Cross website and enter your ID number to validate the certification. The card also has a QR code that they can scan with a smartphone if they choose to do so. In either case, they will be able to view your BLS certification as well as its expiration date.

The AHHA is unique because it offers in-person classes as well as “blended” courses. A blended course takes place primarily online with a few in-person sessions. As mentioned earlier, this is recommended for professionals who already have experience with CPR or BLS. Otherwise, you'll find that it's much easier to learn in-person at one of the many available training centers.

The course from the AHHA is slightly longer than the Red Cross alternative. It will take around 4.5 hours to complete and includes a number of additional tests. The extra time required is small, but it does allow instructors to include additional material that you'll need to know as a live-in healthcare provider.

The certification will need to be renewed similar to the Red Cross BLS certification. The AHHA also provides a review-type course for those who simply need to renew their BLS card. The review course will still take roughly 3 hours to complete.

What Is A BLS Certification And How Can You Get One? was originally seen on ]]> A Basic Life Services Certificate, or BLS certification, is a necessary step on the path to becoming a live-in caregiver. It's also a prerequisite for many other occupations, including physicians, firefighters, nurses, and various other healthcare providers.

Some certification courses are designed and taught by the American Red Cross with final approval coming from their scientific advisory council. There are also alternative certifications available from the American Heart Health Association as well as other third-party providers.

If you're pursuing a career as a live-in healthcare provider, then you've probably run into this term multiple times. You may even be wondering if it's any different from the CPR certification that you've already received. Following is a breakdown of exactly what this certification is, how it differs from CPR certifications, and how you can receive your BLS certification as quickly as possible.

An Introduction To Basic Life Services

BLS courses cover a lot of material ranging from the proper use of bag valve masks to how to perform two-person CPR. In truth, much of what is covered is the same material that would be covered in a CPR course. For that reason, BLS is often referred to as “Healthcare Provider Level CPR”.

This simply means it includes all of the basic CPR material in addition to a small amount of advanced material that would really only be useful to a healthcare provider. An average person may take a standard CPR class just to prepare for emergencies, but only someone interested in becoming a healthcare provider would pursue a full BLS course.

BLS may be more advanced than a standard CPR course, but it's not extremely difficult to learn and master. After all, the “B” stands for “Basic”. This is one of the most basic courses and certifications that a healthcare provider can receive. It's also one of the most important. It's nearly impossible to secure a reliable position as a live-in healthcare provider if you haven't received the certification.

One of the primary focuses during the course is the ABCs of survival. ABC stands for airway, breathing, and circulation. The goal is to clear any obstructions from the airways, make sure the lungs are able to fill with air, and ensure that blood is flowing properly through the body.

How Long Does Certification Take?

The good news is that certification is a fairly quick and straightforward process. If you're already CPR certified, then you'll already understand most of the material. Most people can finish the courses within a few hours using either online or a combination of online and in-person classes.

The in-person classes do offer a more hands-on approach for those who are struggling, but if you're comfortable with the material, then finishing the course online can be more convenient.

The in-person classes use a medical dummy to teach basic techniques and procedures. Again, the structure of the class and the teaching methods will all seem very familiar if you have your CPR certification. If you don't have your CPR certification, then you should definitely attend the class in-person and familiarize yourself with these life-saving techniques using the medical dummy.

Organizations That Offer BLS Certification

The two major organizations that offer BLS certifications are the American Heart Health Association(AHHA) and the American Red Cross(ARC). Both courses are very similar and the certification they provide will work equally well, but they each still have their advantages.

The course available from the Red Cross is called BLS/CPR For Healthcare. Courses are available in cities throughout the country. Completing the course and passing the exam will earn you a BLS certification card. The card and the certification will last for two years from the date of certification.

Keeping your certification up to date is very important if you work in a healthcare profession. You can seek re-certification starting thirty days from the expiration date of the card. As long as you seek certification within thirty days of the expiration date you will not need to take the full BLS course again. Instead, you will take an abbreviated review course which grants certification for an additional two years.

Certification from the Red Cross is visible on the card as well as their website. Potential employers can visit the Red Cross website and enter your ID number to validate the certification. The card also has a QR code that they can scan with a smartphone if they choose to do so. In either case, they will be able to view your BLS certification as well as its expiration date.

The AHHA is unique because it offers in-person classes as well as “blended” courses. A blended course takes place primarily online with a few in-person sessions. As mentioned earlier, this is recommended for professionals who already have experience with CPR or BLS. Otherwise, you'll find that it's much easier to learn in-person at one of the many available training centers.

The course from the AHHA is slightly longer than the Red Cross alternative. It will take around 4.5 hours to complete and includes a number of additional tests. The extra time required is small, but it does allow instructors to include additional material that you'll need to know as a live-in healthcare provider.

The certification will need to be renewed similar to the Red Cross BLS certification. The AHHA also provides a review-type course for those who simply need to renew their BLS card. The review course will still take roughly 3 hours to complete.

What Is A BLS Certification And How Can You Get One? was originally seen on ]]> Benefits Of Learning AHA CPR https://atlantacpr.net/aha-cpr/benefits-of-learning-aha-cpr/ Sat, 05 Oct 2019 00:21:35 +0000 https://atlantacpr.net/?p=1111 On any given day there are numerous injuries that occur to loved ones, friends, colleagues, and strangers that stop them from breathing. This type of incident will typically require quick actions from someone who knows enough to help that individual. When someone has some basic training they are more equipped to help out in this type of emergency. Here we'll take a look at the benefits of learning AHA CPR.

What Is AHA CPR?

AHA Is the American Heart Association. CPR is cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It is a procedure that when performed in an emergency can save someone's life. It is used when someone's heart fails and stops beating. It is estimated that a person's chances of surviving cardiac arrest go up three times when someone is able to administer CPR.

How Likely Is It That Someone Might Use This Procedure?

It is estimated that close to a half a million Americans will die each year from cardiac arrest. Globally it is one of the leading causes of death. In fact, it kills more people worldwide than prostate cancer, breast cancer, pneumonia, HIV, auto accidents, colorectal cancer, house fires, and firearms combined. The great majority of these events happened outside of a hospital.

This means if there isn't someone around that has some training on what to do to help the individual experiencing this emergency then they are likely to die.

When someone is around who has received AHA CPR, the individual experiencing this emergency will be three times more likely to survive than someone having a cardiac arrest when there is no one around with this type of training. Almost 90% of individuals who have a cardiac arrest will die when the event takes place outside of the hospital.

The reason is that there isn't anyone around that has any idea how to help them. It is critical that they get help as quickly as possible.

When someone has basic training and knows how to administer basic CPR they can give that individual the help they need. Even if someone with AHA CPR training only uses it once in a lifetime it means they help save someone's life. Many people would agree that fact makes it well worth going through the training. Even if it's a stranger's life that they save it would be worthwhile and when it's a loved one or close friend the value is immeasurable.

How Likely Is Someone To Suffer Cardiac Arrest While At Work?

It is estimated in the US alone that more than 10,000 people will have a cardiac arrest while at work. If no one is around with basic knowledge about how to give them CPR they have a better than 90% chance of dying. That means that most of them will die if no one in the workplace knows how to help them. When there is someone who is able to provide the necessary assistance the likelihood of their surviving the event improves by three times.

The more people that learn this skill, the more likely it is that someone who has a cardiac arrest can be saved. There is no greater feeling than to know a skill someone possesses has helped to save another person's life. This makes it well worth the time and effort to learn.

Three Additional Reasons To Learn CPR

1. Improves Confidence

There are many professions where having high levels of confidence is very helpful. These can include positions of management, sales, the medical profession, and certainly in professions where individuals deal with emergencies. Life, in general, can be greatly improved when someone has higher levels of confidence.

Learning skills such as CPR often helps in improving a person's confidence. When they feel more certain that they can handle an emergency it improves their confidence.

When someone goes through CPR training they will gain the knowledge to help someone in an emergency. This gives them a sense of empowerment and they know that they have the ability to take control of an emergency situation if it is needed. Gaining the knowledge to become qualified to administer CPR, which is a life-saving procedure, can you give someone significant satisfaction and raise their confidence.

2. Always Be Prepared

Being prepared for the things that might happen in life is very beneficial. It's not possible to know when an emergency will happen. A car accident, a work-related incident, are any number of other events can take place that puts someone into cardiac arrest. Once the emergency happens then it's simply a matter of whether or not that person will get the attention they need fast enough to save their life or not.

When a person does what's necessary to be prepared then when and if an emergency happens they know what to do. It won't matter if the emergency happens while on vacation, while shopping at the grocery store, or while relaxing at home because that person is prepared and when the emergency happens they know what to do. A prepared person is able to save the life of someone having an emergency.

3. Added Value To An Employer

Depending on the field of employment there are employers that would see this type of training as favorable. When someone is competing against other worthy candidates this can be something that sets the individual apart from the others. Prospective employers will like the fact that an individual has made the effort to complete training that could save a life in an emergency situation in the workplace.

The AHA has designed material that anyone with the initiative can learn so that they are equipped to handle an emergency such as cardiac arrest. The American Heart Association is recognized around the world and anyone who goes to they're training will be recognized as someone with the ability to help in an emergency.

The very fact that 90% of individuals who have this type of emergency happen will die if they have the event outside of the hospital is a pity.

If more people had emergency training then a high percentage of those who die could be saved. That is a big reason that more people should consider taking this type of training. It doesn't take long and will provide the individuals who go through it with a lifetime of satisfaction of knowing they are ready.

The following post Benefits Of Learning AHA CPR is available on ]]> On any given day there are numerous injuries that occur to loved ones, friends, colleagues, and strangers that stop them from breathing. This type of incident will typically require quick actions from someone who knows enough to help that individual. When someone has some basic training they are more equipped to help out in this type of emergency. Here we'll take a look at the benefits of learning AHA CPR.

What Is AHA CPR?

AHA Is the American Heart Association. CPR is cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It is a procedure that when performed in an emergency can save someone's life. It is used when someone's heart fails and stops beating. It is estimated that a person's chances of surviving cardiac arrest go up three times when someone is able to administer CPR.

How Likely Is It That Someone Might Use This Procedure?

It is estimated that close to a half a million Americans will die each year from cardiac arrest. Globally it is one of the leading causes of death. In fact, it kills more people worldwide than prostate cancer, breast cancer, pneumonia, HIV, auto accidents, colorectal cancer, house fires, and firearms combined. The great majority of these events happened outside of a hospital.

This means if there isn't someone around that has some training on what to do to help the individual experiencing this emergency then they are likely to die.

When someone is around who has received AHA CPR, the individual experiencing this emergency will be three times more likely to survive than someone having a cardiac arrest when there is no one around with this type of training. Almost 90% of individuals who have a cardiac arrest will die when the event takes place outside of the hospital.

The reason is that there isn't anyone around that has any idea how to help them. It is critical that they get help as quickly as possible.

When someone has basic training and knows how to administer basic CPR they can give that individual the help they need. Even if someone with AHA CPR training only uses it once in a lifetime it means they help save someone's life. Many people would agree that fact makes it well worth going through the training. Even if it's a stranger's life that they save it would be worthwhile and when it's a loved one or close friend the value is immeasurable.

How Likely Is Someone To Suffer Cardiac Arrest While At Work?

It is estimated in the US alone that more than 10,000 people will have a cardiac arrest while at work. If no one is around with basic knowledge about how to give them CPR they have a better than 90% chance of dying. That means that most of them will die if no one in the workplace knows how to help them. When there is someone who is able to provide the necessary assistance the likelihood of their surviving the event improves by three times.

The more people that learn this skill, the more likely it is that someone who has a cardiac arrest can be saved. There is no greater feeling than to know a skill someone possesses has helped to save another person's life. This makes it well worth the time and effort to learn.

Three Additional Reasons To Learn CPR

1. Improves Confidence

There are many professions where having high levels of confidence is very helpful. These can include positions of management, sales, the medical profession, and certainly in professions where individuals deal with emergencies. Life, in general, can be greatly improved when someone has higher levels of confidence.

Learning skills such as CPR often helps in improving a person's confidence. When they feel more certain that they can handle an emergency it improves their confidence.

When someone goes through CPR training they will gain the knowledge to help someone in an emergency. This gives them a sense of empowerment and they know that they have the ability to take control of an emergency situation if it is needed. Gaining the knowledge to become qualified to administer CPR, which is a life-saving procedure, can you give someone significant satisfaction and raise their confidence.

2. Always Be Prepared

Being prepared for the things that might happen in life is very beneficial. It's not possible to know when an emergency will happen. A car accident, a work-related incident, are any number of other events can take place that puts someone into cardiac arrest. Once the emergency happens then it's simply a matter of whether or not that person will get the attention they need fast enough to save their life or not.

When a person does what's necessary to be prepared then when and if an emergency happens they know what to do. It won't matter if the emergency happens while on vacation, while shopping at the grocery store, or while relaxing at home because that person is prepared and when the emergency happens they know what to do. A prepared person is able to save the life of someone having an emergency.

3. Added Value To An Employer

Depending on the field of employment there are employers that would see this type of training as favorable. When someone is competing against other worthy candidates this can be something that sets the individual apart from the others. Prospective employers will like the fact that an individual has made the effort to complete training that could save a life in an emergency situation in the workplace.

The AHA has designed material that anyone with the initiative can learn so that they are equipped to handle an emergency such as cardiac arrest. The American Heart Association is recognized around the world and anyone who goes to they're training will be recognized as someone with the ability to help in an emergency.

The very fact that 90% of individuals who have this type of emergency happen will die if they have the event outside of the hospital is a pity.

If more people had emergency training then a high percentage of those who die could be saved. That is a big reason that more people should consider taking this type of training. It doesn't take long and will provide the individuals who go through it with a lifetime of satisfaction of knowing they are ready.

The following post Benefits Of Learning AHA CPR is available on ]]>